Hello, I’m new

I’ve come to the forum to find identification. I believe I am on the AS but haven’t had a formal diagnosis. I’m in my sixties and autism wasn’t talked about when I was growing up. I may not post much, but if I get identification, it might jolt me from my lethargy and make me go for diagnosis.

I’m pleased to meet you all 

  • Hello Snowcake,

    I was diagnosed three years ago at the age of 67, so you and I are from the same generation.  You're right when you say autism wasn't talked about when we were younger. I had many problems spanning the decades, and doctors didn't seem to consider autism at all, they just put it all down to anxiety and prescribed pills. Happily, times are changing.

    Receiving my diagnosis has been most enlightening, my knowledge and understanding of the condition has slowly expanded, and it has changed the way I think about myself. My lifelong differences and difficulties have gradually made sense as I see things in a new light, helped in part by the rather diverse collection of folk I've met on this forum; it appears that more and more of us are discovering our autistic selves... at last.

    Welcome to the forum, I hope you benefit from joining.

    Ben

  • Hello Snowcake, welcome to our humble abode. Congrats on the self diagnosis! :) I hope you will feel welcome and validated here.

  • Sincere thanks to Rach91, Ben and Annmarie97 for the warm welcomeSlight smile

  • Hi and welcome, I’m 56 and have my assessment soon, people of our generation had no chance of help, if autism had of been known about it would halve been treated as a mental illness that needed curing.

    I’ve chosen to get a formal diagnosis, it’s not for everyone, many here self identify for many different reasons and all valid.I just need I suppose validation to stop my imposter syndrome and to answer a lot of questions through my life.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.

  • Hello Snowcake,

    I too am 67 and have all my life felt and am different from everyone else, a square peg trying to fit into a round hole. I've always been diagnosed with smi given anti-depressants etc but only recently been diagnosed with autism ....everything seems to clicked into place and reading your post makes a lot of sense...but what I can't get my head around is that I have lived my life a lie... your guidance is desperately needed please

  • Hi NAS91753

    Thanks for the welcome. I’m a recovering alcoholic, also, and we have a serenity prayer. It’s helped me with many things in my life. I’m not religious at all, so I use the word God as an acronym; the power to Get Off Drink, which I believe we all have inside us. The prayer is:

    God grant me the serenity,

    To accept the things I cannot change,

    Courage to change the things I can,

    And the wisdom to know the difference

    My life has been a total car crash, even in sobriety. I can’t change it. All I can do is my best, every day. That’s what I try to do. I don’t know if this will help, but it’s part of my routine. I love my daily routines!

  • Thanks for the welcome, Roy  Best of luck with your assessment 

  • Thanks for your reply, alcohol and antidepressants…..I found the alcohol made me more normal, or that’s how I viewed it. I originally thought I was depressed, then I really thought about it, I was depressed as a young child and I knew I functioned differently. The fact was I was struggling in a strange world. It was by total accident, I caught a radio interview with two autistic people, I couldn’t work for the rest of the day, they had pretty much described my life. That was the start of my journey. I was 10 minutes with my GP and he told me I was being referred for an autism assessment. Unfortunately the wait in my area is 2.5 years. I couldn’t afford going private but that time has allowed me to process my eventful life and learn more about autism, there’s things I’ve always done that I never knew were autistic traits.