If you are working, what careers are you in?

I'd like to find a job that doesn't make me constantly overstimulated, overwhelmed and fatigued, but is also intellectually challenging. I absolutely love learning. Has anyone found a role that works for them?

  • I work as a technician, I need quite a wide range of knowledge and there is quite a lot of variety in the job.

    Here is a linkthat might interest you by Temple Grandin titled "Choosing the Right Job for People with ASD":

    https://www.aspergers101.com/choosing-right-job-people-autism-aspergers-syndrome/

  •  I am a social worker. As much as I enjoy it I'm feeling that it is incompatible with me. The unpredictability makes me extremely anxious alongside my need to know exactly what I'm doing. 

    So yeah, don't become a social worker. 

  • Your question is very open ended - are you arty or maths & science loving or a loner or need people around you?   Also, what qualifications have you collected or what are you aiming for?

    Here is a linkthat might interest you by Temple Grandin titled "Choosing the Right Job for People with ASD":

    https://www.aspergers101.com/choosing-right-job-people-autism-aspergers-syndrome/

    The Temple Grandin article is absolutely correct - but it takes a very honest person to do some deep self-analysis to be honest with your strengths and weaknesses - many people delude themselves with 'dream' careers.

    BTW - I'm a rocket-scientist and nuclear physicist / CEng.    Think Mr Data with a pulse.  Smiley

  • Shop supervisor on furlough now.

  • had many jobs

    cleaner

    research scientist

    telesales and many odd jobs

    went through some employment schemes

    now I am a Software Tester ( 15 years  ) of Covid related software which at the moment  is a  one big continuous rush of projects one after another

  • Used to work in the care sector, was in auxiliary nurse in the NHS for a while. Enjoyed it but the role didn't take me anywhere. I was very good at the practical stuff but shied away from getting qualified because I was paranoid about messing up someones drugs (and I didn't want to study for another 2-3 years).

    I was heading for a career to be a psychologist (!), sadly I didn't handle the study too well. I did reasonably well academically, but found it difficult to focus and I burnt out after major projects. After a job interview went bad (the experience was truly awful) I steered away from a PHD and took an office based role.

    Been there for years now in a variety of roles. Tried promotion but I struggle with group discussions, the fluid nature of some of the role and the relationship building (I'm very task orientated and I work better solo. People tend to over-complicate what I see as relatively simple asks).

    My latest is data crunching, analysis of MI and coaching of staff. When I'm given the space to work it's fantastic - it's difficult sometimes because of meetings about meetings, crazy turnarounds, circular discussions, vague asks and senior staff micromanaging and not knowing when to push off. Having said that, I've been secure in employment and well supported since my diagnosis,

    If I had the option to do it again? If I'd been a little more grounded at the time, and if I knew what I knew now, I would have pursued a career as a journalist/freelance writer or gone into some kind of social research. The latter I think would have really worked for me.

  • Hi, NAS, what a great question! Thanks for posing it.

    I work as a teacher, which is apparently an unusual profession for people with Autism. My psychologist has gently and in a completely non-pressuring way suggested to me that I consider changing careers in order to avoid burnout. This, after I’ve disclosed to her that I feel burnout coming soon and that I don’t foresee being able to maintain this career for long.

    In the meantime, I have been able to survive full-time teaching by pursuing roles in which I work in quite a specialist capacity and do not have to work as part of a team or a large team. Instead, I seek positions in which I am ideally in a department of one (just me) or two teachers, and where what I do is so specialized that I don’t have a lot of involvement from school administrators.

    With that being said, I previously worked in the social work field and much preferred those roles, particularly when I could work one-on-one with clients in quiet settings. Sometimes I think about doing that again starting this fall, but it’s a bit of a balancing act because it pays about 70%  of what I make now. If I had a spouse things would be easier because I would have his income as well, but because I’m single this has been a bit of a challenge for me to figure out.

    Ultimately I believe my wellness matters more than money, so who knows where I’ll be, perhaps as early as this fall.

    Thanks for listening!

    Elizabeth

  • Plastic, I had a feeling you did something like that, having read your previous posts.  Awesome. Blush

    Elizabeth

  • but it takes a very honest person to do some deep self-analysis to be honest with your strengths and weaknesses - many people delude themselves with 'dream' careers.

    True.  Apart from a run of the mill careers adviser found in schools etc who maybe don't have the time to carry out the in depth analysis, aptitude tests etc to stop someone becoming a "square peg in a round hole" in their choice of career, are you aware where people on the autistic spectrum can get such a tailered advice?  If there was such a service it would be a boon for job seekers on the spectrum, enabling them to get jobs in which they thrive.