Examples of Repetitive Behaviours / Insistence on Sameness that led to a positive diagnosis

Hi all,

I'm still digging around trying to understand what sorts of things are counted as meeting threshold for RRBs / IS in an autism diagnosis. Please note that I don't intend to fake any at my upcoming ADOS! What I'm after is some examples that allow me to settle the question in my mind that wonders if my clinical interview missed RRBs / IS that I *do* have, but aren't the stereotypical "obvious" ones.

I don't want a positive diagnosis if I'm not genuinely ASD, but neither do I want a negative diagnosis if I *am*.

Apart from the minor success I've had in discovering the RBQ2a, I'm drawing a blank in my internet based research.

Parents
  • I think it is very difficult to know what "counts".

    For example, I was explaining on another thread, I've seen many dietitians and actually most people have the same breakfast and the same lunch each day. It's actually not considered problematic unless not getting to have your particular breakfast or lunch every day exactly the same causes quite a significant impairment in your ability to function.

    This is obviously just one example but I think it is often based on the response and ability to cope. I could be wrong but I remember having it explained once that it's okay and perfectly "normal" to have quite a repetitive life with "unusual" behaviours or quirks. It is considered "disordered" or "significant" based on the level of distress caused by change or not being able to engage in these behaviours. 

Reply
  • I think it is very difficult to know what "counts".

    For example, I was explaining on another thread, I've seen many dietitians and actually most people have the same breakfast and the same lunch each day. It's actually not considered problematic unless not getting to have your particular breakfast or lunch every day exactly the same causes quite a significant impairment in your ability to function.

    This is obviously just one example but I think it is often based on the response and ability to cope. I could be wrong but I remember having it explained once that it's okay and perfectly "normal" to have quite a repetitive life with "unusual" behaviours or quirks. It is considered "disordered" or "significant" based on the level of distress caused by change or not being able to engage in these behaviours. 

Children