Do I tell people

so today I was diagnosed with mild autism and mild aspergers, I wanted to ask should I tell everyone?

Parents
  • I would be careful about telling your employer - depending on your management and HR department's attitude to disabilities. It can be used against you if they choose not to support you - you might become 'too much bother' - so even though nothing has changed about you or your worrk, they might start to look at you very differently.

    They might start treating you like a hand grenade with the pin pulled out - just waiting for you to do something that they can make a mountain out of.

    If your employer is positive and caring about their staff - go for it.

  • I would be careful about telling your employer - depending on your management and HR department's attitude to disabilities. It can be used against you if they choose not to support you - you might become 'too much bother'

    Sorry, Plastic, but I must take issue with you there.  It's not about management or HR's attitudes to disabilities.  It's simply illegal for them to discriminate on the grounds of a disability (and that's if you think of autism as a disability).  The same as it's illegal to discriminate against someone who became pregnant, or developed a heart condition (depending on the context of the job being done).  And if they use it against a person and choose not to support them, that can be regarded - depending on circumstances - as bullying or constructive dismissal.  I'd certainly think it would be a wise option to have a union on board, mind.  There are still avenues of recourse, though.  If you're doing your job well, and there's no reason to fault you in any way, why should an employer try to make life difficult?  Another point is, if you don't say anything, you could put yourself at risk later on - if it's found out - for being deceitful.  It could happen if, for instance, there was an incident at work that resulted in an anxiety attack or meltdown, or if you were moved to an environment which was detrimental to any hyper- or hypo-sensitivity.  More noise, brighter lights, etc.

    Having said that, I do realise that some employers are more 'enlightened' than others.  Again, I think Jason should take his time - and he will know best what the situation is, and what the reaction is likely to be.  Just as long as he is aware that there could also be attendant risks of non-disclosure.

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  • I would be careful about telling your employer - depending on your management and HR department's attitude to disabilities. It can be used against you if they choose not to support you - you might become 'too much bother'

    Sorry, Plastic, but I must take issue with you there.  It's not about management or HR's attitudes to disabilities.  It's simply illegal for them to discriminate on the grounds of a disability (and that's if you think of autism as a disability).  The same as it's illegal to discriminate against someone who became pregnant, or developed a heart condition (depending on the context of the job being done).  And if they use it against a person and choose not to support them, that can be regarded - depending on circumstances - as bullying or constructive dismissal.  I'd certainly think it would be a wise option to have a union on board, mind.  There are still avenues of recourse, though.  If you're doing your job well, and there's no reason to fault you in any way, why should an employer try to make life difficult?  Another point is, if you don't say anything, you could put yourself at risk later on - if it's found out - for being deceitful.  It could happen if, for instance, there was an incident at work that resulted in an anxiety attack or meltdown, or if you were moved to an environment which was detrimental to any hyper- or hypo-sensitivity.  More noise, brighter lights, etc.

    Having said that, I do realise that some employers are more 'enlightened' than others.  Again, I think Jason should take his time - and he will know best what the situation is, and what the reaction is likely to be.  Just as long as he is aware that there could also be attendant risks of non-disclosure.

Children