Insomnia from shift work

I made a reasonable adjustments request to my employer to try and get more fixed hours instead of working shift work as doing very irregular hours is having a detrimental impact on my health and wellbeing. My employer has refused to do it dispite doing it for other colleagues. I've been told I can't as I don't have children  So I shouldn't be asking for fixed working hours. I feel like I can't get into a good routine with my job and reslly feeling the struggle of it. 

Any advice? 

Parents
  • Hi Ashley.  It looks like you do the same work that I do - and I've faced that issue before.  A colleague with young children got exemption from shift changes, as did another colleague who had a disabled spouse to care for at home.  You have a diagnosis, so you could reasonably argue that you're being discriminated against when other colleagues get the adjustment without being 'disabled'.

    Check out what it says here.  The Equality Act is quite specific.  If you're in a Union, you could also approach them for advice. 

    Equality Act

    The Act describes a disabled person as someone having “a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”

    Mental impairments include autism and most autistic people are likely to fit this description, but you do not have to have a diagnosis to be considered a disabled person.  

Reply
  • Hi Ashley.  It looks like you do the same work that I do - and I've faced that issue before.  A colleague with young children got exemption from shift changes, as did another colleague who had a disabled spouse to care for at home.  You have a diagnosis, so you could reasonably argue that you're being discriminated against when other colleagues get the adjustment without being 'disabled'.

    Check out what it says here.  The Equality Act is quite specific.  If you're in a Union, you could also approach them for advice. 

    Equality Act

    The Act describes a disabled person as someone having “a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”

    Mental impairments include autism and most autistic people are likely to fit this description, but you do not have to have a diagnosis to be considered a disabled person.  

Children