Could we write the book?

I was wondering, if we could somehow as a group, contrive to write a book for people who hear one of the two the A words for the first time, at an inconvenient time in their lives. 

I thought perhaps we could precede it with a kind of "differential diagnosis" process over a few months, so as we come up with a tome that suits all emerging Autists.

But the effort would need some structuring and require some leadership, and possibly even access to different parts of the software that drives this forum or certainly a greater understanding of how better we can use it as a collaborative tool. It's beyond me as a solo effort, and I suspect many of us.

I think if we got it into the hands of the NHS, so that on the way home from your diagnosis, you could be reassured that there is a better future waiting for you, and be shown some practcial steps to get going in the right direction it would make the news a bit easier to take for some of us. We could include a section on metal ju-jitsu too, for when the normies do that thing they do... 

I'll bet with a well written "go-fund me", we could easily cover physical printing and worldwide distribution costs.

Any interest?

Parents
  • I might be biased here Smiley

    But I think there is likely a growing need for information aimed at the 45-55 +/- 5yrs range.

    There seems to be a lot of people getting diagnosed in this age range, especially people who have never considered that they might actually have a condition in the first place.

    I know a few people who have known their diagnosis since teens or mid twenties, and they have different tools and coping mechanisms to help them. Whether that is a positive or negative, I don't know.

    I think a lot of older people with late diagnosis have a lot more stuff to unravel, but some might also handle the diagnosis better.

    Similarly, although many people already have access to support networks, or are familiar with counselling/therapies due to other health and mental health conditions, people like me are coming into this cold.

    Somehow, I have completely bypassed all of this. Whether I never had any issues, or nobody noticed, I don't know. But I definitely battled along on my own, without even considering if I had a condition or if there was any support available. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

Reply
  • I might be biased here Smiley

    But I think there is likely a growing need for information aimed at the 45-55 +/- 5yrs range.

    There seems to be a lot of people getting diagnosed in this age range, especially people who have never considered that they might actually have a condition in the first place.

    I know a few people who have known their diagnosis since teens or mid twenties, and they have different tools and coping mechanisms to help them. Whether that is a positive or negative, I don't know.

    I think a lot of older people with late diagnosis have a lot more stuff to unravel, but some might also handle the diagnosis better.

    Similarly, although many people already have access to support networks, or are familiar with counselling/therapies due to other health and mental health conditions, people like me are coming into this cold.

    Somehow, I have completely bypassed all of this. Whether I never had any issues, or nobody noticed, I don't know. But I definitely battled along on my own, without even considering if I had a condition or if there was any support available. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

Children
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