Please be aware that assessment does not always = diagnosis

Hi, I've noticed a few people saying that they are going for their diagnosis or going to get their child diagnosed.  I was just wondering if they mean they are going for an assessment, because that does not always equal a diagnosis.  I didn't want people to build their hopes too high or pay privately on the basis  that they believe a diagnosis is certain.  I knew I was going for an assessment but still believed I would probably be diagnosed - now I'm less sure.

Edit:  As SpaceOctopus has now pointed out though - not being diagnosed does not always mean you don't have autism (I hope I have paraphrased correctly - you can read the comment for the specifics of what was said).

- And second opinions can be sought - although the NAS says that they may reach the same conclusion as the first.

Parents
  • While there are a great deal of valid points being made, I did want to note the necessary distinction between diagnoses of autism AND autism as a biologically situated condition. Autism is not something which exists only in terms of interactions between people or as a diagnostic category, even if the understanding of autism itself is shaped by these factors. Indeed, the concept of autism draws on a history of clinical work preceding it and is shaped by these concerns - either defining itself against or with these histories.

    In short, it should be made clear that not being diagnosed as having autism does not provide any certainty that an individual is not autistic - but that they fall outside of the currently dominant set of diagnostic criteria for autism.

Reply
  • While there are a great deal of valid points being made, I did want to note the necessary distinction between diagnoses of autism AND autism as a biologically situated condition. Autism is not something which exists only in terms of interactions between people or as a diagnostic category, even if the understanding of autism itself is shaped by these factors. Indeed, the concept of autism draws on a history of clinical work preceding it and is shaped by these concerns - either defining itself against or with these histories.

    In short, it should be made clear that not being diagnosed as having autism does not provide any certainty that an individual is not autistic - but that they fall outside of the currently dominant set of diagnostic criteria for autism.

Children