Speech Delay

Dear All,

My son was diagnosed on autistic spectrum last year. He is 5 now and started main stream school this year.

The main area of concern for me is his speech delay. He hardly say one words and  is all by himself. As he do not speak thus stay aloof from kids of his age. At home, If he needs anything he will just pin point or may be use one word. 

Is there any good/trusted  book online which I can buy and will be useful in helping him frame sentences, 

Thanks

Parents
  • A common mistake parents often make is teaching their autistic child that the behaviours they have due to being autistic are wrong in and that they must change them to fit in with his peers who have a predominant neurotype. Your say his speech is an area of concern for you. Is his speech an area of concern for him? If it isn't and he's happy doing his own thing why force him to change? If he is happy I'd leave him to it for now and hopefully, others have some ideas of books you can you use if he wants to improve his speech. If he isn't happy I hope they help him now.

    It might be useful for you to know that as an autistic I spoke later than my peers and was very happy with this. In fact when I could speak I often stayed extremely quiet during my school years as I found the needs of my NT peers tedious, especially their need for small talk and to gossip about others. The fact that I don't waste my time on these things has been an advantage throughout my adult life and especially my career as I've been able to focus on what needs to be done. For example, as I concentrated on learning my craft, instead of office tittle-tattle, I was promoted to the role of advanced teacher less than a year after qualifying as a teacher. This meant my practice was at such a high level I was required to spend part of my time delivering staff development sessions.

Reply
  • A common mistake parents often make is teaching their autistic child that the behaviours they have due to being autistic are wrong in and that they must change them to fit in with his peers who have a predominant neurotype. Your say his speech is an area of concern for you. Is his speech an area of concern for him? If it isn't and he's happy doing his own thing why force him to change? If he is happy I'd leave him to it for now and hopefully, others have some ideas of books you can you use if he wants to improve his speech. If he isn't happy I hope they help him now.

    It might be useful for you to know that as an autistic I spoke later than my peers and was very happy with this. In fact when I could speak I often stayed extremely quiet during my school years as I found the needs of my NT peers tedious, especially their need for small talk and to gossip about others. The fact that I don't waste my time on these things has been an advantage throughout my adult life and especially my career as I've been able to focus on what needs to be done. For example, as I concentrated on learning my craft, instead of office tittle-tattle, I was promoted to the role of advanced teacher less than a year after qualifying as a teacher. This meant my practice was at such a high level I was required to spend part of my time delivering staff development sessions.

Children