Job interviews, should I mention my Asperger's?

Hi, I have a job interview next week, and I don't know whether to mention that I have Aspergers or not, would you? it's not something I like to mention but I feel I should mention it because I don't want any misunderstandings between myself and the staff,  as with my last job, which I recently got sacked from because of my  "erratic " behavior and " attitude". I never told them about my Asperger's when I started working there.

Parents
  • Hi there.

    It's up to you - but I always mention it, and I think it's good policy to mention it.  There's always the fear, of course, that they might discriminate.  But some employers are actually more on the ball, and will value the qualities that often go with the condition: reliability, honesty, an eye for detail, a conscientious attitude... and, quite often, a disinterest in the usual workplace gossip!  You could always discuss how it affects you, too, to set their mind at rest in case.

    If you don't mention it, you always run the risk that they may find out some way down the line and challenge you on it.  They could fire you, if they were of a mind, for not disclosing it.  The risk is higher, of course, if something happens - you have problems with some area of the work, for instance - and they want to know why.  Too late then to ask for 'reasonable adjustments'.

    Good luck with the interview.  What job is it that you're going for?

Reply
  • Hi there.

    It's up to you - but I always mention it, and I think it's good policy to mention it.  There's always the fear, of course, that they might discriminate.  But some employers are actually more on the ball, and will value the qualities that often go with the condition: reliability, honesty, an eye for detail, a conscientious attitude... and, quite often, a disinterest in the usual workplace gossip!  You could always discuss how it affects you, too, to set their mind at rest in case.

    If you don't mention it, you always run the risk that they may find out some way down the line and challenge you on it.  They could fire you, if they were of a mind, for not disclosing it.  The risk is higher, of course, if something happens - you have problems with some area of the work, for instance - and they want to know why.  Too late then to ask for 'reasonable adjustments'.

    Good luck with the interview.  What job is it that you're going for?

Children