Hey...I’m new to here

Hello everyone. 

I’m very proud mummy to my son who is yet to be told he has autism but I have been told he is border line which I have no idea which that mean. I feel like I’ve got no where to turn as the family around me think it’s normal and he will be fine. He has recently had a visit from the child development team and I do t where to go from here. He has been lashing out at other children at his nursery and which I’ve told them he does like to left alone when they said he struggling to make friends and has no interest in making friends, and I’ve said if they get too much he will lash out and they seem not to take any interest in me. Is this just me or have other parents has this too? I’m scared he isn’t going get the help that he need through out his life. I’ve also been told it’s a 2 year waiting list before he has his final assessment and that’s what is scary to me as he isn’t getting any help that he needs

sorry to put so much but I just do t on where to turn anymore

Parents
  • Hi,

    Welcome to the forum, at 2 your son doesn't have to go to nursery and if it is causing him problems you are quite entitled not to send him. However while he is at nursery it helps build an accurate picture for professionals that show areas that he struggles with, which helps when he gets to the assessment stage. 

    His nursery should have policy in place to support children with additional needs as he is awaiting diagnosis they should be supporting him. 

    As for support for you both have you looked at asking for a family support worker (not social worker)  they can be really helpful getting things moving for your son as they will liase and advise nursery on the best way forward. They can also try and hurry diagnosis up and advise you what help is available to you now. I avoided them for years thinking they were like social workers that just criticise what ever you do but since being allocated one six months ago more has been done for my daughter in that time than the 6 years before

Reply Children