Flying / Airport special assistance IATA

Flying for me isn't easy. Which I can stuggle with it all but it can be things can be made easyer. All airline's/airport's use the IATA codes for special assistance (International Air Transport Association) https://www.iata.org/

Knowing the correct IATA code can making the call to airline a lot easy. As you should tell your Airline "Special Assistance" at least 2 day prior to travel that need this support (of couse the earlier you tell them the better). You can just turn up at Airport but be warned this is not advisable the it could take some time to get assistance to you, if at all.

The most commonly used code is for people with Autism/Aspergers is the IATA code is DPNA

Most (not all) Airports can give you hidden disabilty lanyard (free). You do not have inform them prior to travel. Have the persion with Autism or another fealow member of you party to wear it to get some extra support.

It could be a good thing to do both things and register with airline and get lanyard if you can.

Only a few Airports have Autisum sensory room, these are new thing https://www.businesstraveller.com/business-travel/2018/10/01/gatwick-opens-sensory-room 

Is there any tips which I have not mentioned.

Parents
  • Great resource, thanks

    I used Special Assistance for my autistic daughter to fly unaccompanied (this is different from lanyard). They arranged to guide her through the airport, and to meet and guide her through at the destination from the plane to the pick up point. It went well.

    I think it is important to stress that Special Assistance should be booked through the airline, because this way it ensures they will arrange it at the destination end of the journey. Basically the airline is responsible to subcontract the assistance at the airport. It should also give them 48 hours notice.

    This is the link for Heathrow, it is explained well, but other airports would have similar:

    https://www.heathrow.com/airport-guide/assistance-at-heathrow/request-assistance

    "Before you leave home

    Under European legislation, your airline is responsible when you are on board the aircraft. Heathrow is responsible for providing special assistance at the airport. Therefore, please book all assistance through your airline (your airline’s website will contain details of how to do this). Heathrow Airport cannot book additional assistance.

    • Please inform your airline, tour operator or travel agent of your particular requirement at the time of booking, or at least 48 hours before your travel. Try to give as much notice as possible so we can make the arrangements. If you haven't booked we will do our best to assist you, but will always give priority to passengers who have booked in advance.
    • Your assistance requirement will be passed to our service provider, Omniserv.
    • You should also inform your airline, tour operator or travel agent if you intend to take your own mobility device (such as a wheelchair or scooter).

    Assistance is available for all age groups, including young travellers."

    This is the link to UK Civil Aviation Authority advice:

    https://www.caa.co.uk/passengers/prm/passengers-with-disabilities-and-reduced-mobility/

    This is for when things go wrong :(https://www.tradingstandards.uk/news-policy/news-room/2016/disabilities-know-your-rights-when-travelling-by-plane

Reply
  • Great resource, thanks

    I used Special Assistance for my autistic daughter to fly unaccompanied (this is different from lanyard). They arranged to guide her through the airport, and to meet and guide her through at the destination from the plane to the pick up point. It went well.

    I think it is important to stress that Special Assistance should be booked through the airline, because this way it ensures they will arrange it at the destination end of the journey. Basically the airline is responsible to subcontract the assistance at the airport. It should also give them 48 hours notice.

    This is the link for Heathrow, it is explained well, but other airports would have similar:

    https://www.heathrow.com/airport-guide/assistance-at-heathrow/request-assistance

    "Before you leave home

    Under European legislation, your airline is responsible when you are on board the aircraft. Heathrow is responsible for providing special assistance at the airport. Therefore, please book all assistance through your airline (your airline’s website will contain details of how to do this). Heathrow Airport cannot book additional assistance.

    • Please inform your airline, tour operator or travel agent of your particular requirement at the time of booking, or at least 48 hours before your travel. Try to give as much notice as possible so we can make the arrangements. If you haven't booked we will do our best to assist you, but will always give priority to passengers who have booked in advance.
    • Your assistance requirement will be passed to our service provider, Omniserv.
    • You should also inform your airline, tour operator or travel agent if you intend to take your own mobility device (such as a wheelchair or scooter).

    Assistance is available for all age groups, including young travellers."

    This is the link to UK Civil Aviation Authority advice:

    https://www.caa.co.uk/passengers/prm/passengers-with-disabilities-and-reduced-mobility/

    This is for when things go wrong :(https://www.tradingstandards.uk/news-policy/news-room/2016/disabilities-know-your-rights-when-travelling-by-plane

Children