representation for autistic daughter in work disciplinary?

Hi, i was hoping if someone could point me in the right direction of somebody to speak to in regards of a disciplinary hearing my autistic daughter has at her workplace. I feel like she should be able to have someone with her due to her disability, in what would be a very stressful and overwhelming situation for people without autism, she works in a school and has been told no on else can speak for her, i don't think this gives her a fair crack at the whip, it does not seem like they are taking her autism into account here at all. thanks in advance for any help you could offer me. Dan 

Parents
  • The only people who are legally entitled to accompany an employee in a disciplinary are a work colleague or a representative of a trade union.

    However you could ask, as a reasonable adjustment for a support worker to be in the meeting with your daughter or a prfessional who knows your daughter well and the problems she faces. 

    If this is refused, you can help her by writing some notes for her, quoting the equality act and the way autism affects your daughter. Things like anxiety, depression which causes stress, misunderstanding, delayed comprehension, literal understanding can all help. I dont know what the disciplinary is about but stress can be a defence especially as it is a comorbid condition with autism.

    Whatever the outcome is, there is a right to appeal if it goes against her and I would take that chance, in my experience an appeal is often successful, but make sure you list a lot of your daughters autistic traits as well as the way this has contributed to the alleged behaviour, always assuming the behaviour took place - if she denies the behaviour autism can also help explain how things may be misinterpreted.

    Also contact Access to Work, who can help your daughter by getting a support worker, trsining for staff to understand autism, and recommending adjustments. And consider joining a union appropriate for her job and recognised by her employer for help if there are problems in the future. 

    I am a union representative as well as being autistic. 

Reply
  • The only people who are legally entitled to accompany an employee in a disciplinary are a work colleague or a representative of a trade union.

    However you could ask, as a reasonable adjustment for a support worker to be in the meeting with your daughter or a prfessional who knows your daughter well and the problems she faces. 

    If this is refused, you can help her by writing some notes for her, quoting the equality act and the way autism affects your daughter. Things like anxiety, depression which causes stress, misunderstanding, delayed comprehension, literal understanding can all help. I dont know what the disciplinary is about but stress can be a defence especially as it is a comorbid condition with autism.

    Whatever the outcome is, there is a right to appeal if it goes against her and I would take that chance, in my experience an appeal is often successful, but make sure you list a lot of your daughters autistic traits as well as the way this has contributed to the alleged behaviour, always assuming the behaviour took place - if she denies the behaviour autism can also help explain how things may be misinterpreted.

    Also contact Access to Work, who can help your daughter by getting a support worker, trsining for staff to understand autism, and recommending adjustments. And consider joining a union appropriate for her job and recognised by her employer for help if there are problems in the future. 

    I am a union representative as well as being autistic. 

Children