Am I overthinking this? How do I interpret this?

I am arranging to meet one of my friends this weekend. I had a specific day in the diary (this Sunday) arranged with her for about three weeks now.

She has just got back to me asking if I am still okay for Sunday, but also did I mind if her other friend (they are very close) joins us too. She says that her other friend is coming to visit her this weekend, as it is the only one she is free before Christmas. My friend did say 'if you'd rather do another time no worries'. What does 'no worries' mean in this context?

Do you think that this is a sign that my friend was too nervous to meet me on her own, or am I overthinking it?

Parents

  • She has just got back to me asking if I am still okay for Sunday, but also did I mind if her other friend (they are very close) joins us too. She says that her other friend is coming to visit her this weekend, as it is the only one she is free before Christmas. My friend did say 'if you'd rather do another time no worries'. What does 'no worries' mean in this context?

    'No worries' in the given context means that your friend would like you either to meet her close friend as well as herself on Sunday, or else if you are not comfortable doing so yourself ~ she would like to make an alternative arrangement to meet with you at a later date.

    So whichever way you would rather go about meeting with her ~ she would be comfortable (as in not stressed or worried) with either arrangement, and she is giving you the option of the most viable alternative given the social cramming thing usually associated with this time of the year.


    Do you think that this is a sign that my friend was too nervous to meet me on her own, or am I overthinking it?

    You could be overthinking things here perhaps, unless you cancel the Sunday thing on the basis of three's a crowd ~ and your friend proves hard to get hold of thereafter.

    I think the most important question is though how do you feel about meeting your friend's close friend?

    Would you be for instance too nervous yourself to socialise comfortably with both your friend and her friend as well?

    Might it be too much for you, or might you enjoy it as possibly being a compliment also that your friend would like you to meet, even?


Reply

  • She has just got back to me asking if I am still okay for Sunday, but also did I mind if her other friend (they are very close) joins us too. She says that her other friend is coming to visit her this weekend, as it is the only one she is free before Christmas. My friend did say 'if you'd rather do another time no worries'. What does 'no worries' mean in this context?

    'No worries' in the given context means that your friend would like you either to meet her close friend as well as herself on Sunday, or else if you are not comfortable doing so yourself ~ she would like to make an alternative arrangement to meet with you at a later date.

    So whichever way you would rather go about meeting with her ~ she would be comfortable (as in not stressed or worried) with either arrangement, and she is giving you the option of the most viable alternative given the social cramming thing usually associated with this time of the year.


    Do you think that this is a sign that my friend was too nervous to meet me on her own, or am I overthinking it?

    You could be overthinking things here perhaps, unless you cancel the Sunday thing on the basis of three's a crowd ~ and your friend proves hard to get hold of thereafter.

    I think the most important question is though how do you feel about meeting your friend's close friend?

    Would you be for instance too nervous yourself to socialise comfortably with both your friend and her friend as well?

    Might it be too much for you, or might you enjoy it as possibly being a compliment also that your friend would like you to meet, even?


Children