My son is getting expelled

Hi there 

my son has recently got a asd diagnosis, although I have been fighting for this since he was 3, he’s now 12. We have consistently coped with the struggle of school. Not wanting the uniform on due to the feel, others being to close, teachers voices etc .

i moved him to a primary school in year six to ease his transition into a state school with good sen support. He is coming to the end of year 8 now . Since the beginning he has struggled, he does not attend many lessons due to his anxiety and needing to use his ‘card’. The school have a daily battle to keep him in lessons and resource staff to be with him. He gets constant detentions for defiance.  We have put plan after plan in to ‘start again’. The school are done, I get a daily email report now offering a breakdown of his day. Making as many links to his behaviour as possible. They are putting together a paper trail of evidence to exclude. I recognise this as I have done similar in my job as a teacher.

i have asked what happens if they exclude, they would prefer a managed move, if we refuse their choice I assume we are without education. 

My son is desperate to stay in school and is frightened of getting excluded, compounding the anxiety and of course making the behaviour worse. It’s like a vicious cycle.

i have been alone in this for so long. I do not know anyone with an autistic child and it feels very scary and lonely.

my only option I feel is home Ed, but as a single mum with full financial responsibility it’s not feasible. I have to work.

just someone that knows how crap this is would be something. Even with a diagnosis I feel like it’s my fault somehow, it breaks my heart to see how my son suffers like this yet I’m frustrated with the situation.

anyway any advice would be great right now. Thank you 

Parents
  • My gut is that they are discriminating against your son. (just a bit like constructive dismissal). And in fact they are giving you more evidence. So have a read of this website and get thier help.

    https://www.ipsea.org.uk/pages/category/exclusion-from-school

    The Equality Act 2010 sets out a number of ways in which a pupil may be discriminated against because of disability:

    • Unfavourable treatment arising from disability: when a school treats a pupil badly because of something connected to their disability, such as not allowing their assistance dog into the school or penalising them for needing time off for medical appointments, and the school does not have a good reason for doing so. 
    • Direct discrimination: when the school treats the pupil worse than a non-disabled pupil in a similar situation because of their disability. 
    • Indirect discrimination: where a school has a particular policy or way of working that has a worse impact on disabled people compared to people who are not disabled. This is unlawful unless the organisation or employer is able to show that there is a good reason for the policy and it is proportionate. 
    • Failure to make a reasonable adjustment: schools should make reasonable adjustments to accommodate pupils with disabilities. What is reasonable depends on the facts – the Equality and Human Rights Commission have published guidance on reasonable adjustments in schools which can help you work this out. 
    • Harassment: When the pupil is treated by a staff member in a way that makes them feel humiliated, offended or degraded. 
    • Victimisation: When the pupil is treated badly because they or their parents have made a complaint of discrimination under the Equality Act 2010.
Reply
  • My gut is that they are discriminating against your son. (just a bit like constructive dismissal). And in fact they are giving you more evidence. So have a read of this website and get thier help.

    https://www.ipsea.org.uk/pages/category/exclusion-from-school

    The Equality Act 2010 sets out a number of ways in which a pupil may be discriminated against because of disability:

    • Unfavourable treatment arising from disability: when a school treats a pupil badly because of something connected to their disability, such as not allowing their assistance dog into the school or penalising them for needing time off for medical appointments, and the school does not have a good reason for doing so. 
    • Direct discrimination: when the school treats the pupil worse than a non-disabled pupil in a similar situation because of their disability. 
    • Indirect discrimination: where a school has a particular policy or way of working that has a worse impact on disabled people compared to people who are not disabled. This is unlawful unless the organisation or employer is able to show that there is a good reason for the policy and it is proportionate. 
    • Failure to make a reasonable adjustment: schools should make reasonable adjustments to accommodate pupils with disabilities. What is reasonable depends on the facts – the Equality and Human Rights Commission have published guidance on reasonable adjustments in schools which can help you work this out. 
    • Harassment: When the pupil is treated by a staff member in a way that makes them feel humiliated, offended or degraded. 
    • Victimisation: When the pupil is treated badly because they or their parents have made a complaint of discrimination under the Equality Act 2010.
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