Open plan offices can make you MISERABLE: Seeing colleagues all day leads to distraction and irritation, say scientists.

Open plan offices can make you MISERABLE: Seeing colleagues all day leads to distraction and irritation, say scientists

Researchers from CTF, Service Research Centre at Karlstad University in Sweden have found that open plan offices are counter-productive and bad for staff morale (stock).

The article.

Do you agree?

I know that I do not like open plan office and they make me miserable.

Parents
  • For me personally, I detest open plan offices.

    I worked in one place that not only had everyone working in the same open-plan area, but the 'staff room' was also incorporated into the very same open office! Thus, on your much-coveted break times, you'd still be able to see and hear everything that was going on. Likewise, you could be on the phone to a client, and a colleague would be putting the dishwasher or microwave on right next to you.

    For me, this was an absolute and constant onslaught to my Neurodivergent senses. Whether I was trying to speak to a customer and getting the strong waft of cooking pasties, or trying to relax on my lunchbreak but getting colleagues shouting at me for advice across the office, it was all too much. I've never been claustrophobic, but there was a sense of suffocating - as there was nowhere to retreat from the stiflingly-hot air, the bright fluorescent lights, or the constant ambient noise level etc. I found it utterly draining and overwhelming.

    It got to the point whereby I had to quit, even though I had no back-up plan.

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  • For me personally, I detest open plan offices.

    I worked in one place that not only had everyone working in the same open-plan area, but the 'staff room' was also incorporated into the very same open office! Thus, on your much-coveted break times, you'd still be able to see and hear everything that was going on. Likewise, you could be on the phone to a client, and a colleague would be putting the dishwasher or microwave on right next to you.

    For me, this was an absolute and constant onslaught to my Neurodivergent senses. Whether I was trying to speak to a customer and getting the strong waft of cooking pasties, or trying to relax on my lunchbreak but getting colleagues shouting at me for advice across the office, it was all too much. I've never been claustrophobic, but there was a sense of suffocating - as there was nowhere to retreat from the stiflingly-hot air, the bright fluorescent lights, or the constant ambient noise level etc. I found it utterly draining and overwhelming.

    It got to the point whereby I had to quit, even though I had no back-up plan.

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