National Key Scheme for toilets.

I have had a 'Radar' National Key Scheme key for some time.

I find public toilets impossible, they are smelly and unhygeinic with wet (urine) soaked floors, rudimentary handwashing facilities, and only slightly better than wetting myself. I will only use one when absolutely desperate.   I therefore thought that as I was Autistic I would get a key so I could use the 'disabled' toilet.

Problem is, I cannot bring myself to use it.  I do not have a wheelchair or have physical problems using a 'normal' toilet.  The problems I have are a mental aversion.  On the odd occasion I have used the 'disabled' toilet (what a strange name, it is not the toilet that is disabled, it works perfectly!) it is because the normal one is out of use.  And it has always been a lot cleaner and more pleasant.

So should I just grit my teeth and bear the normal toilets?  Or should I ignore the (perceived) thoughts of those who think I should not use the disabled toilet.  Or is it the case I should not use the disabled toilet at all as they are only intended for those who are physically disabled?

Parents
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  • I’m glad to hear I’m not the only one who has trouble with toilets when out and about. I won’t even use the ones at work which isn’t ideal.

    My solution (similar to what Robert has said) is to have a few “safe” places where I know I can go to the toilets and they will be in a pleasant state. Alternatively, I have been known to deliberately not drink anything while I’m out so that I don’t have to go - not recommended but I’d rather that than the anxiety of using a toilet when out.

    I’ve never used a disabled toilet personally, though I probably will have to soon when I have surgery on my knee. I do see the issue with people being judgemental if you don’t have a physical disability, but in my mind mental and physical disability should be equal, especially when it comes to basic needs such as using the toilet. Some places are getting better at putting signage on their disabled toilet that say things like ‘Not all disabilities are visible’ and I think that’s a good idea to help with some of the judgemental people.

    Most importantly, try to come up with a solution that doesn’t make you anxious or uncomfortable.

Children
  • My solution (similar to what Robert has said) is to have a few “safe” places where I know I can go to the toilets and they will be in a pleasant state. Alternatively, I have been known to deliberately not drink anything while I’m out so that I don’t have to go - not recommended but I’d rather that than the anxiety of using a toilet when out.

    I have the same approach.