Exhaustion and uni

Hi, 

So upon reading upon symptoms of being on the spectrum I noted there was mental exhaustion. I never out this down to a symptom of asperges untill reading about it, I just assumed I was lazy/ permantly happy to sleep. 

I've started uni this year and unfortunately the timetable is all over the place and hectic with no set times or days which I'm finding hard to then attend 100% because I'm just so drained from the hectic schedule week after week, interacting with people and then working at my.job all weekend as well as finding time for my.partner extremely difficult. 

Is this normal feelings and dofficulties to have as someone on the spectrum? And how can I help myself? 

I also find the fact this first year is a foundation and nothing I'm actually interested in with regards to my actually degree means I'm inciredbly unmotivated and don't bother although I no it's still important for me to do what I want.

Is this usual also ? And any tips ? 

Thank you for taking the time to read 

  • Hi Nadielou,

    I think you might find it useful to contact our Education Rights Service for information, support and advice on educational provision and entitlements. You might find they can help you to think about what your University could/should be doing to help support you? Please see the following link for further information:
    http://www.autism.org.uk/services/helplines/education-rights.aspx

    There may be some other community members able to share personal experiences of what has worked for them too.

    Kind regards,

    Heather - Mod

  • Hi,

    I'm autistic too and am at Uni - again doing my PhD.  Yes, autism and tiredness go together especially at uni.  I have a mentor through Disability Student's Allowance.  I see them almost every week.  They keep my motivation going in the right direction (most of the time).

    Visit your disability adviser at the university for further advice.

    Good luck,

    Margaret

  • Your university may provide access to specialists study skills mentoring. This could help you to develop strategies that require less mental energy. For example, I use speed reading software to increase my reading speed (http://www.readsy.co/). If you contact your university's disbality services they'd be able to help arrange this and an autism mentor.